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Tiny device could drive remote CAN bus assassinations Black Hat VIDEO Car hackers Charlie Miller and Chris Valasek have again hacked a 2014 Jeep Cherokee, this time by physically linking a laptop to commandeer its steering and kill the brakes. The duo have captured the hack to be presented at Black Hat Las Vegas this week in video proof-of-concept demonstrations. The compromise requires attackers to be physically present in order to compromise the car. However Miller confirmed this writer's suggestion that the attacks could be carried out using a concealed device which either contains automated and timed commands, or iwth remote attacks over a wireless link. Such a feat which Miller says were "most definitely" possible could be considered a vector for targeted, albeit over-engineered, assassination. The localised attack is similar to other CAN bus attacks in which researchers have popped locks, compromised steering, and brakes. There are legitimate uses for tapping CAN buses that have spawned companies which manufacture products that tap into the ports in order to display detailed fuel consumption and engine data to drivers, for example. In one of the proof-of-concept videos Miller sits in the back of the Jeep with a lead connecting his laptop to the CAN bus above the dashboard. Youtube Video Valasek cruises at low speed through a cornfield road until Miller causes the steering wheel of the Jeep to lock 90 degrees to the right sending it off road. The attack affects the same Jeep which was patched after the duo remotely hacked it last year killing the engine during a live demonstration on US highway I-64. Youtube Video The pair attacked the Jeep's electronic control units disabling one by sending it into a maintenance mode and using another to send spoofed commands. Cruise control speed can also be set but drivers can quickly regain control by tapping brakes. Youtube Video The pair say they've penned a paper, to be revealed at Black Hat, in which they recommend vehicle manufacturers should better lock down CAN buses.

To help auto-makers along, the pair have built an intrusion detection system that can detect their attacks. ® Sponsored: 2016 Cyberthreat defense report
It's not cool to kill a demo, but you can watch all the pr0n you want Black Hat Neil Wyler and Bart Stump are responsible for managing what is probably the world’s most-attacked wireless network. The two friends, veterans among a team of two dozen, are at the time of writing knee deep in the task of running the network at Black Hat, the security event where the world reveals the latest security messes. The event kicks off with three days of training, then unleashes tempered anarchy as the conference proper gets under way. Wyler, better known as Grifter (@grifter801), heads the network operations centre (NoC) at Black Hat, an event he has loved since he was 12 years-old. “I literally grew up among the community,” he says. Bart (@stumper55) shares the job. Wyler's day job is working for RSA's incident response team while Stumper is an engineer with Optiv, but their Black Hat and DEF CON experience trumps their professional status. Wyler has worked with Black Hat for 13 years and DEF CON for 16 years, while Stump has chalked up nine years with both hacker meets. Together with an army of capable network engineers and hackers they operate one of the few hacker conference networks that delegates and journalists are officially advised to avoid. Rightly so; over the next week the world’s talented hacker contingent will flood Las Vegas for Black Hat and DEF CON, the biggest infosec party week of the year.

The diverse talents – and ethics – of the attending masses render everything from local ATMs to medical implants potentially hostile and not-to-be-trusted. Some 23 network and security types represent the network operations centre (NoC) and are responsible for policing the Black Hat network they help create.

Come August each member loosens the strict defensive mindset they uphold in their day jobs as system administrators and security defenders to let the partying hackers launch all but the nastiest attacks over their network. “We will sit back and monitor attacks as they happen," Wyler tells The Register from his home in the US. "It's not your average security job." The Black Hat NoC.
Image: supplied. The crew operates with conference din as a background, sometimes due to cheers as speakers pull off showy hacks or offer impressive technical demos in rotating shifts.
In the NoC, some laugh, some sleep, and all work in a pitch broken by the glow of LEDs and computer screens.

Their score is a backdrop of crunching cheese Nachos, old hacker movies, and electronic music. "Picture it in the movies, and that's what it's like," Stump says, commiserating with your Australia-based scribe's Vegas absence; "it'll be quite a sight, you'll be missing something". Delegates need not.

The NoC will again be housed in The Fish Bowl, a glass den housing the crew and mascots Lyle the stuffed ape and Helga the inflatable sheep.

Delegates are welcome to gawk. Risky click The NoC operators at Black Hat and DEF CON need to check their defensive reflexes at the door in part to allow a user base consisting almost entirely of hackers to pull pranks and spar, and in part to allow presenters to legitimately demonstrate the black arts of malware. When you see traffic like that, you immediately go into mitigation mode to respond to that threat," Wyler says. "Black Hat is a very interesting network because you can't do that - we have to ask if we are about to ruin some guy's demonstration on stage in front of 4000 people". Stump recalls intruding on a training session in a bid to claim the scalp of a Black Hat found slinging the infamous Zeus banking trojan. "The presenter says 'it's all good, we are just sending it up to AWS for our labs' and we had a laugh; I couldn't take the normal security approach and simply block crazy shit like this." Flipping malware will get you noticed and monitored by one of the NoC's eager operators who will watch to see if things escalate beyond what's expected of a normal demonstration. If legitimate attacks are seeping out of a training room, the sight of Wyler, Stump, or any other NoC cop wordlessly entering with a walkie-talkie clipped to hip and a laptop under arm is enough for the Black Hat activity to cease. "It is part of the fun for us," Wyler says. "Being able to track attacks to a location and have a chat." Targeting the Black Hat network itself will immediately anger the NoC, however. The team has found all manner of malware pinging command and control servers over its network, some intentional, and some from unwittingly infected delegates. "We'll burst in and say anyone who's MAC address ends with this, clean up your machine," Stump says. $4000 smut-fest Training is by far the most expensive part of a hacker conference. Of the 71 training sessions running over the weekend past ahead of the Black Hat main conference, each cost between US$2500 (£1887, A$3287) and US$5300 (£4000, A$6966) with many students having the charge covered by generous bosses. Bart and the blow up doll cameo on CNN Money. So it was to this writer's initial incredulity that most of the sea of "weird porn" flowing through the Black Hat pipes stems from randy training students. "It is more than it should ever be," Wyler says of the Vegas con's porn obsession. "While you are at a training class - I mean it's not even during lunch." The titillating tidbit was noticed when one NoC cop hacked together a script to pull and project random images from the network traffic on Fish Bowl monitors.

A barrage of flesh sent the shocked operators into laughing fits of ALT-TAB.

Another moment was captured when Stump was filmed for on CNN Money and a shopper's blow up doll appeared with perfect timing. Balancing act Black Hat's NoC started as an effective but hacked-together effort by a group of friends just ahead of the conference.

Think Security Onion, intrusion detection running on Kali, and Openbsd boxes. Now they have brought on security and network muscle, some recruited from a cruise through a cruise of the expo floor, including two one gigabyte pipes from CenturyLink with both running about 600Mbps on each. "We were used to being a group of friends hanging out where a lot of stuff happened on site, and now we've brought in outsiders," Stump says. Ruckus Wireless, Fortinet, and CenturyLink are now some of the vendors that help cater to Black Hat's more than 70 independent networks. "It's shenanigans," Wyler says. "But we love it." The pair do not and cannot work on the DEF CON networks since they are still being built during Black Hat, but they volunteer nonetheless leading and helping out with events, parties, and demo labs.
I feel a responsibility to give back to the community which feeds me," Wyler says. "That's why we put in the late nights." ® Sponsored: 2016 Cyberthreat defense report
Man behind exposed.su document dump and swatting rampage jailed The New York man behind a 2014 data dump site exposed.su has been sentenced to a year in prison, plus 12 months for time already served, for doxing high-profile figures including First Lady Michelle Obama, Presidential candidate Donald Trump, and artist Jay Z, and placing dozens of highly-dangerous swatting calls. Mir Islam, 22, exposed data on some 50 public figures including former FBI director Robert Mueller, former Central Intelligence Agency Director John Brennan, and celebrities Ashton Kutcher, Beyonce, and Tom Cruise. Their personal information was uploaded to exposed.su triggering a MediaOutrageStormTM. KrebsonSecurity reported at the time that the hackers were obtaining cheap credit reports using information provided by the sssndob.ru service. Swatting is the practice of calling police to report bogus threats at a victim's location, an action that often results in the appearance of heavily armed SWAT officers. Islam pleaded guilty on 6 July last year to three charges including one count of conspiracy to commit a range of federal offenses, including identity theft; access device fraud; social security number misuse; computer fraud; wire fraud; assaulting federal officials; and interstate transmission of threats.

The other charges included one count of threatening and conveying false information concerning the use of explosives and one count of cyber-stalking. “The crimes committed by this defendant violated the privacy of dozens of people, fostered identity theft, and endangered the safety of many others,” US Attorney Channey Phillips says. “Mir Islam put people at risk on the internet and in their own homes, placed responding police officers at risk, created a dangerous situation on a college campus, caused substantial emotional distress to numerous victims, and diverted law enforcement from work they could be doing to protect the public. "Today’s sentence reflects the seriousness of his crimes and hopefully will deter others from similar actions.” KrebsonSecurity reports Islam's defence argued he suffered from multiple psychological disorders and that the crimes were perpetrated from a sense of “anarchic libertarianism” intended to expose government overreach on consumer privacy and use of force. Islam was previously arrested with 24 others under the FBIs Carder Profit sting, but was sentenced to a mere day in jail. The hacker admits to running Exposed.su while cooperating with police during the time of the Carder Profit arrests, Krebs on Security reports. Islam was re-arrested in September 2013 for violating the terms of his parole, and for the swatting and doxing attacks to which he pled guilty. ® Sponsored: 2016 Cyberthreat defense report